GoPro HERO8 disassembly guide

Disclaimer: Do this at your own risk! You will lose your GoPro’s warranty and you may end up bricking the camera if something goes wrong.
This guide is not authorized by GoPro and your camera is not guaranteed to work afterwards.
The methods used in this guide may not be “best practice”. I’m merely sharing what worked for me.
Credit: Jonah Blaeser for Naked Cinewhoop Community

Tools
iFixit iOpener
iFixit Spudger
iFixit Halberd Spudger
T3 Torx screwdriver
T4 Torx screwdriver
T5 Torx screwdriver
Phillips #000 screwdriver
Note: Not sponsored by iFixit. I just like their stuff.

Step 0
Before you start disassembling your Hero8 Black, go to the preferences menu and set the WiFi frequency to 2.4GHz. Without the stock WiFi antenna this seems to work better than 5GHz WiFi and it doesn’t interfere with your FPV feed.
You may also check that QuikCapture is turned on. This allows you to turn on the GoPro and start recording with a single press of the Record button.
Lastly, make sure that you have your profiles set up the way you want them to be. This is only possible with the touchscreen or the GoPro app, therefore, it’s easier to do this before you start the “teardown”.

Step 1
Remove the battery and SD card. During this step you can also remove the battery door. It’s obviously not needed for a naked GoPro.

Step 2
Remove the folding fingers by unscrewing the four T5 Torx screws.

Step 3
Apply a heated iOpener to the front of the GoPro for a few minutes to melt the adhesive under the faceplate. A hot air gun may also work but be careful to not overheat anything.This step isn’t necessary, but it will make the following removal of the faceplate much easier.

Step 4
Use a spudger to pry off the faceplate. The two holes near the microphones on the lower right corner of the GoPro are a good starting point.
It is not recommended to use sharp metal tools like a screwdriver for this because there are delicate parts inside the GoPro that are easy to break (specifically the front LCD’s ribbon cable).

Step 5
Note: The protective lens is glued to a plastic part that is mounted to the midframe with four T4 Torx screws. Unfortunately, the adhesive used to secure the lens seems to be significantly stronger than the plastic part. I haven’t been able to remove the protective lens without breaking the plastic part underneath. This step will show the easiest way to break said plastic part in order to remove the protective lens from the midframe. Use a spudger and push it between the two plastic edges to pry off the protective lens.
This step is easier with a metal spudger or screwdriver. If you use a metal tool, be careful to not slip and damage the actual lens under the protective glass.

Step 6
Remove the six T4 Torx screws.

Step 7
Using a spudger, slowly lift the mainboard assembly out of the housing.
Be careful when pulling on the mainboard as it is still connected to the housing by four cables. These cables may break if stretched and/or damage the corresponding connectors on the mainboard.

Step 8
Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the ribbon cable of the USB module straight up from its socket on the mainboard.

Step 9
Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the ribbon cable of the mode button/touchscreen straight up from its socket on the mainboard.

Step 10
Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the ribbon cable of the GPS module/record button and the battery cable straight up from their sockets on the mainboard.

Step 11
Peel off the thin metal film on the back of the sensor’s PCB. It’s held in place by a weak thermal adhesive and should come off easily.

Step 12
In order to remove the battery compartment, put your finger inside the compartment and push it out until it starts to separate from the housing. You can then use a spudger to push it out (or continue with your finger).
The battery compartment is glued to the back of the touchscreen with a weak adhesive and shouln’t be too hard to remove.

Step 13
Remove the two #000 Phillips screws.

Step 14
Remove the little metal bracket at the bottom of the housing. It is held in place by four plastic rivets and can be removed by using a spudger to carefully push it out.

Step 15
The USB Module is held in place by two rivets. Carefully push it out with a spudger.

Step 16
Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the touchscreen’s ribbon cables straight up from their sockets.

Step 17
Use a spudger to separate the large metal bracket from the housing. Be carful when doing that because the ribbon cable is not only glued to the metal bracket, but also attached to the speaker with a little piece of double-sided tape.

Step 18
Use a spudger to remove the record button/GPS module assembly from the housing. Separate the connection on the left side (orange) first and then the one in the middle (red).

Step 19
Use a halberd spudger (or a similarly thin, non-metal tool) to lift the retention bracket on the GPS module’s connector and separate the record button from the GPS.

Step 20
Carefully remove the power/record buttons’ ribbon cables from the metal brackets. They are secured with a weak adhesive and should be easy to remove, but they’re still very fragile and break easily. Keep that in mind and don’t pull on them too hard/fast.

Step 21
Congratulations! You now have a naked GoPro that weighs just 29.7 g. Simply reconnect the three ribbon cables and use the USB-C connector to power your GoPro from a 5 V source.
29.7 g is still too heavy for you? Well, continue with step 22 then.

Step 22
Remove the two T3 Torx screws.
Then remove the retention bracket that holds the sensor’s ribbon cable in place.

Step 23
Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the ribbon cables of the microphones and front LCD straight up from their sockets on the mainboard.

Step 24
Remove the four #000 Phillips screws.

Step 25
Use the flat end of a spudger to pry the sensor’s ribbon cable straight up from its socket on the mainboard.

Step 26
Peel off the thin metal film on the back of the mainboard. It’s held in place by a weak thermal adhesive and should come off easily.

Step 27
Remove the mainboard from the midframe.

Step 28
Remove the two #000 Phillips screws. Then remove the sensor assembly from the midframe. There is a little bit of adhesive between the lens and the main frame that will cause some resistance when you remove the lens, but you can just pull it off without risking any damage.

Step 29
Congratulations! You now have a naked GoPro that weighs just 14.8g. Simply reconnect the sensor, the three ribbon cables and use the USB-C connector to power your GoPro from a 5V source.BTW: The front status LED on the Hero8 has been relocated from a ribbon cable (previous generations) to the mainboard. You don’t need the front LCD to know whether your GoPro is recording or not.

Mainboard pads

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